Tag Archives: birminghamUK

I’m the Trinity Mirror ‘Student Journalist of the Year’ 2008!

I recently won the Trinity Mirror  ‘Student Journalist of the Year’ award, and went to dinner with a few of the local media folk.

I would just like to take this opportunity to thank Paul Bradshaw, for supporting me and guiding me through my final year university project, and making it possible for me to be even considered for such an award.

I haven’t been blogging on this site for a while, mainly due to being frustrated at not being able to land myself a job in the media industry. Even though I have won the above award, I’m still trying to make my first steps in the industry and I’m finding it very difficult.

I recently interviewed David Miliband for Yoosk, which was an amazing experience, and I really hope that I am considered to do such work again.

Other than that, you can follow where I am, what I’m doing, and who with on my Twitter page, which I update more frequently.

Hopefully I’ll have more to tell you very soon!

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SEO for Joomla – The ENO Guide

NB – This is the first time I’m writing a post with the new WordPress WYSIWIG editor, I must say – I’m indifferent towards it.

I have recently been reading up on how to make the ENO site more Search Engine Optimised (SEO) – so that I can try and push the site higher up in a Google search.

The ‘Top Joomla SEO tips’ I found, were:

  1. Using keywords in the Title tag:

    The number one factor in ranking a page on any search engine is the title tag.
    These are the words in the source of a page in <title> and appear in the blue bar of the browser.

    “Choose the title of an article very carefully. Joomla will use the title of the article in the title tag (what appears in the blue bar). It will also be the text used in any insite links (see also 5 and 6).”

  2. The Anchor Text of the Inbound Link

    Anchor text is the text that appears underlined and in blue (unless it’s been styled) for a link from one webpage to another.
  3. Global Link Popularity of the Site (PageRank)

    How many pages are linking to ENO is called link popularity, or in Google, PageRank.

    “The more sites link to you, the better. Joomla is a CMS that helps you add content quickly. Create one quality content page per day. Quality content is the most important factor to getting bound links. For a site that will perform well, you eventually need 200 odd pages of content. This is the important point. QUICK SEO IS DEAD. The only way to perform well in SEO now is to have a rich content site.”

  4. The Age of the Site This one is self explanatory – ENO hasn’t been live for very long, so it would be foolish to expect it to be on the first page of a Google search. Sites that have been live for longer will naturally have more content, which means more links, which means they will be higher up in Google searches.
  5. Link Popularity WITHIN the Site This refers to how many pages link to the main website from inside the domain. The more links there are to a particular article will improve its relevance in Google search results. If an author of one article links to another related article on the same website (pretty much as you would with a blog) – then ENO will appear higher in a Google search.
  6. The ‘Topical Relevance’ of Inbound Links, and the Popularity of the Linking site

    To improve the ranking of ENO, it is imperative that the incoming links to the site (i.e. sites that link to ENO) have a high PageRank in Google. This means the links have to be from a site that is topically related to ENO, and one that has a high rank too.

  7. Using Keywords in the Body Text

    This refers to the keyword density of the phrase that you are optimizing for, in the content of the page.
    A German study into this, identified some interesting results:

    Targeted keywords in the first and last paragraphs. There is a simple trick here, write your quality content, and then use the tool of your choice to find the keyword density. THEN, take the top three words and add them to the meta keywords in the parameters part of the page (in Joomla admin). This is somewhat backwards for some maybe, it optimizes a page for what you actually wrote, rather than trying to write a page optimized for certain words (which I always find difficult).

    Keywords in H2-H6 headline tags seem to have an influence on the rankings while keywords in H1 headline tags seem to be getting less valuable. Modify the output of the core content component through a template override file.

    Using keywords in bold or strong tags – slight effect, same with img alt tags and filenames.

Hopefully, using these methods that I’ve found, and asking the Journalists to do the same, I can drive more traffic to the website. I think that I should be more closely monitoring the traffic to the website so that I can possibly tailor particular pages to suit specific users.

Reflections on JEEcamp

Well, I’m sure over the coming days that many of yesterdays attendees at JEEcamp will no doubt be posting their views on how yesterday’s event went.

EDIT: Tom Scotney already has – see what he took from JEEcamp here.

A success

There is no doubt in my mind that yesterday’s event was a success. I personally took a lot of information, and insight from it (more later in the post), and others will have taken their own opinions away from it.

I was part of the blog team, along with a few other students, who were relaying the day’s events to the viewers of a live blog, (via CoverItLive), and others were twittering away as the speakers delivered their speeches and pitches.

An RSS feed of all of the attendees twitter accounts, and anything tagged ‘JEEcamp’, can be found here – some of it makes for some very interesting reading.

436

Rick Waghorn, founder of myfootballwriter.com, began the day’s proceedings with a keynote speech about how his business came to be, amongst other things.

Rick said that his site attracted 33,000 unique visitors in January – and whilst that may be down to the transfer window opening, it is certainly impressive.

The more interesting figures that Rick mentioned are 436 – the average number of seconds that a single user spends on the site, and 3.5 – the average number of visits his site will get in a month.

Laura Oliver of journalism.co.uk has written more about Rick’s keynote speech, which can be found here.

Funding

Once the speech was over, the conference split up into its discussion groups, which included Online News Models, Communities, Legals, Fundings, and Business Models. I covered funding, which was hosted by Rick Waghorn.

Alex Gamela has given a brief overview of the other discussions, and key points to come out of yesterdays events.

The main things to come out of this discussion, other than a sustained attack on Google’s advertising models were:

  • To be successful, you need a five year financial forecast. Rick uses iReport, for which CNN bought the domain without even giving it a thought, or doing anything with it. Rick hasn’t an idea what his domain is worth. (He paid £16 for his site.)
  • Why doesn’t the Trinity Mirror set up a fund like the Knight Foundation for smaller companies?
  • Some local papers panic and put everything online, in an effort to keep up with the nationals.
  • You have to earn over $50 with Adsense before you can claim your money
    How many sites must there be UNDER that threshold?
  • Demographically, if you took out everybody over the age of 60 in local newspaper circulation, where would you be?
  • The fundamental challenge is to persuade potential investors to invest in your product/site, without OVERspending or releasing too much equity into the project.

Pitches

The most well recieved of the day’s pitches was Nigel Eccles‘ project Hubdub – a news prediction website where users bet on the outcome of certain news stories using ‘play’ money. This clearly has the potential to grow very quickly and Nigel was a man who was most definitely in demand after his speech. (It had 42,000 unique visitors in its first week!)

However, a key point raised during his pitch was ‘Should Hubdub place ethical restrictions on its questions?’ – because currently, a user is able to sign up and pose ethically incorrect questions, such as something regarding a missing child. We posed this question to the viewers of the live blog – 42% agreed that it should, while 58% didn’t).

This was the most well recieved of the three pitches (Which included scribblesheet, and qotz – a project still in development).

Panel Discussion

The day ended with an informal Q&A session with Mark Comerford, Martin Stabe, Kyle MacRae, and Sarah Hartley.

This was definitely where I picked up most of the key points from the day.

The panel believed that advances in technologies, such as mobile, RSS, and broadband – just make people use what was originally present more often. Mark believed that traditional media have no real strategy for utilising output on mobile phones, and as a result “Newspapers aren’t dying – we’re committing suicide”.

The panel then went on to discuss Qik – software for mobile phones that allows users to stream video directly from their mobile phones. They believed that such software changes everything, and anybody can now walk around with a live TV camera in their pocket.

Such advances allow journalists to change the way they tell their stories – and it allows the public to tell their stories back to journalists. Mark believed that journalists are tired of being seen as ‘the voice of the people’, when they are simply A voice IN the field (of journalism).

This raised the age old debate of ‘Do we need Journalists?’ which was quickly answered with ‘Who is a journalist may not be as important as “What is Journalism?’. The panel agreed that it was an issue of trust – and if journalism isn’t transparent, the public will go to a news source that is – which may not neccessarily be a journalist.

If journalists want people to engage with them, they need to bring the stories TO the public, rather than waiting for the public to go to the press. Most news organisations clearly try to get UGC (user generated content) for free, which is detrimental to the medium. What they should be doing is working together to become part of a ‘sharing partnership’ – which would benefit both freelancers and news organisations.

Young Journalists – The future?

Mark’s final point was the one that really drove home with me.

He mentioned that young Journalists are more technically skilled than their older superiors, but they are being put into difficult positions – where they have the neccessary journalistic skills, but not the power or the experience needed.

“It’s the same as leaving a bunch of kids in a car park for long enough and then expecting them to know how to drive.”

Referring to my final year project, and a discussion that I had with Pete Ashton at the end of the event – Initially I was worried that I had to design and run a website and a CMS – and that was my biggest stumbling block.

I realised by the end of the event that I shouldn’t have been worried about how the website might look or how and where I was going to get it online – I should instead place more of an emphasis on how I’m going to drive traffic to the website and keep users coming back to it.

The very last point from JEEcamp was also VERY relevant:

“Now is the best time to be a journalist. The demand is for journalists who WANT to tell a story. All of the contacts, features, etc, are in place to become a great journalist. This is THE time to be a journalist. It doesnt get much better than this.”

And that is pretty much that, roll on next year!

PS – I also gave a video interview to the European Journalism Centre – I’ll link to it once they get it online.

Blog Tig – Finding Local Bloggers

The ‘Birmingham: It’s Not Shit’ blog  has started a game of “blog tig” (or blog tag) in a bid to find out who else is blogging in the UK’s second city.

I thought I’d get myself in on a piece of the action.

The rules of ‘Blog Tig’ are as follows:

  1. “Each player starts with an odd, but fun, fact about Brum and one odd, but fun, fact about their blog.
  2. “At the end of your blog, you need to choose two people to get tagged and list their names.
  3. “Tag your post “birminghamUK” and “brumblogtig” (the second one is a memetag).
  4. “People who are tagged need to write a post on their own blog (with their version of the post) and post these rules (or link to them here). They can tie it in with their particular subject if they so wish.
  5. “Don’t forget to leave them a comment telling them they’re tagged, and to read your blog.

As Paul Bradshaw says, my blog also isn’t specifically about Birmingham – but I’m based here and blog from here so I feel that qualifies me enough to join in!

Brum Fact

Birmingham has more trees than Paris, more miles of canals than Venice and more parks than any other European City.
Source: Metroblogging Birmingham
 

Blog Fact

This fact is random, but not so much fun:
I will have blogged more this month than I have between the whole of June – August 2007.

Who I’m Tagging

I’m tagging Rachael Wilson, and Tuuli Platner.